Indiana Representative: Man Can’t Possibly Affect Climate Change (VIDEO)

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An Indiana representative claims it’s arrogant to think humans can cause climate change. He’s ignoring the science involved.

We know that many current Republicans seem to have a hard time understanding science, especially when it comes to science they feel threatens the economic livelihood of their major benefactors. Indiana representative Todd Rokita weighed in on climate change after a town hall meeting in his district:

“I think it’s arrogant that we think as people that we can somehow change the climate of the whole earth when science is telling us that there’s a cycle to all this,” he said. “And that cycle was occurring before the industrial revolution and I suspect will occur way into the future.”

Rokita’s claim is partially right; there is a “cycle to all of this,” and that cycle was occurring before man began to contribute to it and it will certainly continue. But he was either ignorant of or deliberately neglected to fill in all of the details. The website SkepticalScience.com is a wealth of information about climate change myths. They offer the following explanation of what happens when humans add to the carbon cycle:

Before the industrial revolution, the CO2 content in the air remained quite steady for thousands of years. Natural CO2 is not static, however. It is generated by natural processes, and absorbed by others. But consider what happens when more CO2 is released from outside of the natural carbon cycle – by burning fossil fuels. Although our output of 29 gigatons of CO2 is tiny compared to the 750 gigatons moving through the carbon cycle each year, it adds up because the land and ocean cannot absorb all of the extra CO2. About 40% of this additional CO2 is absorbed. The rest remains in the atmosphere, and as a consequence, atmospheric CO2 is at its highest level in 15 to 20 million years (Tripati 2009). (A natural change of 100ppm normally takes 5,000 to 20,000 years. The recent increase of 100ppm has taken just 120 years).

So yes, there is a natural carbon cycle, and human activities are overloading it. A simple example you can show your friends is provided below… here’s the video: