New Poll Shows The Tea Party Is Dying

New Poll Shows The Tea Party Is Dying

The number of American adults who identify as being opposed to the Tea Party is at an all time high of 30%. Image: sobyrne99

Gallup has released a new survey showing that a majority of Republicans and Republican leaning independents do not support the Tea Party. The survey shows that over the course of four years the number of Republicans who identify as supporters of the Tea Party has dropped by one-third overall. The survey also shows that 11% of Republicans are actively against the Tea Party.

This shows a continued trend of the GOP distancing themselves from the radical right platform that has become synonymous with neoliberalist interests, complete disregard for the environment, Christian fascism, bigotry towards homosexuals, and atrocious spelling on protest signs. In November 2010, 61% of Republicans were supporters of the Tea Party, an all time high.  The number of American adults in 2014 who actively support the Tea Party is now only 22%. In a 2012 Gallup released a poll showing that 22% of Republicans thought that gay marriage should be legal. Let that sink in. There are at least as many Republicans who support gay marriage as adults who support the Tea Party. Probably significantly more given trends on Americans stance toward gay marriage between 2012 and 2014.

The number of American adults who identify as being opposed to the Tea Party is at an all time high of 30%.

Those who are among the supporters of the Tea Party unsurprisingly appear to be very demographically similar across a wide range of metrics. According to Gallup,

 “Republicans who are supporters of the Tea Party are remarkably similar to other Republicans across most demographic categories — including race and ethnicity, income, age, education, or region of country. Republican Tea Party supporters are somewhat more likely to be weekly church attenders and slightly more likely to be men.”

Survey methods Gallup Conducted:

Results for this Gallup poll are based on telephone interviews conducted April 24-30, 2014, with a random sample of 1,513 adults, aged 18 and older, living in all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia.