Republicans Are Going Crazy After Pope Frances Suggests Redistributing Wealth

Author: May 10, 2014 11:30 pm
Pope Francis

Pope Francis; image@CatholicEWUK

Uh-oh, the Marxist is back! And he’s preaching what Jesus did thousand of years ago: take care of our poor. Tapping again on the “economy of exclusion,” Pope Francis, who has showed the world what a true Christian leader is, and has called on the world’s governments to redistribute their masses of wealth to those who need it the most — the poor and vulnerable. My God, how very un-Christian of him. He actually cares for the poor?

Pope Francis met with the U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and other heads of major U.N. agencies who were converging in Rome this week. Pope Francis made his appeal to the Secretary-General to usher in a “worldwide ethical mobilization of solidarity with the poor in a new spirit of generosity.”

More specifically, the Pope said that a more equal form of economic progress can be achieved through “the legitimate redistribution of economic benefits by the state, as well as indispensable cooperation between the private sector and civil society.” Some will call is socialism, some will call it Marxism, and others will call it what it truly is: humanity.

Well, isn’t this awkward. “Christian” Republicans are really going to hate this, as they have hated him since he took the papacy last year. Being told what the gospel is actually about does not go down well with Republicans, because when someone wants to help the underprivileged in this country, or in the rest of the world, they brand them as Marxists or socialists, words they don’t seem to fully understand.

It appears that Catholic Republicans are in quite a pickle. Do they follow the lead of the Pope, God’s representation on Earth, or do they follow Paul Ryan?

I find it very odd that Catholic Republicans pick and choose their ideological standpoints when it comes to abortion, contreception and gay marriage. There are currently sixty-eight Republican members of the Catholic Caucus in the United States Congress. They identify themselves with the church, and its beliefs. Certainly the Church differs from progressives on issues likes abortion and gay marriage, but I want to know how many Republicans backed:

These Republicans are a member of quite a Marxist church, if you ask me. This a classic example of how Republicans ignore and cherry pick. The Catholic Church has preached all of these things, and Republicans have ignored it on every level. But oh no, when the Pope calls on people to give more to the poor, and calls it ‘redistribution,’ Republicans freak.

Last December, Fox News even dedicated an entire negative article geared at Pope Francis, just nine months into his tenure. The title – ‘Pope Francis is the Catholic Church’s Obama – God help us.’ I can only imagine what is going through their heads now.

Oh wait, yes I can! “Catholic” Sean Hannity’s head exploded over the Pope’s call to redistribute the wealth. According to Hannity, he is “not happy about this.” Hannity called the Pope a “to each according to his own need, from each according to his ability redistributionist.” Hannity decided to lecture the Pope on how to live the teachings of Jesus Christ. What a concept. A TV talking head, lecturing the successor of Saint Peter how to interpret biblical teachings.

Republicans fear the Pope. That shows, without a doubt, he’s doing his job.

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7 Comments

  • Sell the gold candlesticks to those who can use gold in a more constructive manner- Electronics for one thing.

    Selling all you’ve got and then giving the money to the poor, oh wait- that’s not Christian!?

    • Of course it’s the Christian thing to do with one’s OWN goods. But who actually owns the candlesticks at, say, St. Peter’s Basilica? As an analogy, who has the right to sell a statue or painting out of the Louvre?

      Some of the Church’s treasures such as hundreds of years old statues, parts of buildings, paintings, and so on, would be rather difficult to sell. You may not have a lot of admiration for irreplaceable religious art, but I would rather it remain in the Vatican than in someone’s house.

      I think if Catholics decided to imitate Francis’s simple lifestyle and such an attitude spreads, he’s done as good a job as any of us have.

      • um, check me on this line of reasoning, please.

        The statues, sculptures, moveable paintings–I never meant that anyone should chisel paintings out of walls, or pull down pillars to sell–comprise not only an incredible trove of historical significance, but would be a significant draw to tourists at museums all over the world.

        Along with the gold candlesticks, the gold thrones, the cloth-of-gold robes, the ridiculous–sorry again, I mean deeply moving and of undoubted significance to God–headdresses that Liberace would have looked askance at wearing, and the incredible hoard of gems, jeweled trinkets, gold and other precious metals, that if sold to museums around the world, would be at least worth some mosquito nets. Or tankers full of clean water, or the tech to make clean water out of salt or polluted, which would be even better, and which exists today!

        I’m not Catholic either, but I know that there are priceless works of literature buried in their archives, works that most scholars have to beg to see, and many never do. While the incredible collection of antique pornography they’re reputed to have squirreled away might have to go to private collectors, most of the other treasures should not be used to keep supposedly religious figures of a major religion(that preaches the collection of riches is a sure way not to get into heaven) in comfort the Borgias of old would have wept in envy of. Instead they should be made available to scholars and students of the arts all over the world.

        That pretty much covers the ‘sell them to who’ question that you asked, although I’m sure that, people being people, some of them will still end up in the hands of the feral rich. As long as they don’t want them burned when they die, like that rich idiot in Japan a few years ago, anything that helps the people of the world and puts some Catholic skin in the game is still okay with me.

        As far as who has the authority, well, that appears to me to be pretty straightforward as well. The treasures were donated (and in some cases confiscated, embezzled, extorted, or stolen) in the name of, or for, the Catholic Church. Once again, I’m not suggesting that any of the frankly incredible art that is a part of the buildings or large properties of the Catholic Church should be chiseled up piecemeal. But since the Pope is the Voice of God Incarnate, and he is the best person, according to Catholic Doctrine, to ask God’s permission to sell some of the loot–I mean treasure–that the church has collected over the centuries, I sort of see a conversation that might go something like this–

        Pope: God? We have some issues down here, I know that you know that. Lots of people have too little, and a few greedy people have too much, but will not help the many. We have the resources to make a significant difference in the lives of billions of people, we can help them obtain technology that will make good, pure water available to people who have none, and protection from the worst of the disease-carrying insects, and medicine to help them when they are ill. All I have to do is authorize the sale of some of the artworks and treasure stored in the Vatican vaults. I want to do this, God, I have the authority to do it, and unless you tell me not to, I am going to prove to the world that the Catholic Church is not an organization of empty words and promises. Please, God, if you want Your Church to keep all of these things, and ignore the plight of the poor and suffering we might ease in some small way, please just tell me not to do this thing.

        God:

        Pope: Thank you, God.

        Cmare, for someone who’s not Catholic, you sure went out of your way not to perform a little critical analysis that I just did on the fly for you as I typed this reply, instead defending the Catholic Church’s ‘right’ to keep billions of dollars of STUFF that no one can eat, keep warm or cool with, use to get or stay healthy, or drink.

        Sorry for the length of the answer, but since you asked the questions, I thought you might need details in the replies to them.

        Any further questions, please feel free to ask, if I don’t already know the answer I’ll be glad to look it up on my computer.

        Henry D. Rinehart

  • I’m not Catholic but every time I hear the argument that the Church should “sell all the golden candlesticks” the question pops up in my head, “Sell them to who?”

    All that art does not belong to the Pope, so who would do the selling? I always pictured the Vatican’s collection as the property of a sort of museum rather than that of one very rich man.

    And once these priceless works have been sold to the highest bidders, and the money redistributed (I am conveniently not asking how to go about doing that fairly) then what? The Church is stripped of a good chunk of its better history, some rich pig has the Pieta in his living room.

    I don’t see any good coming of it. Why not continue to live as simple a life as possible (which Francis does) and do his job, which is to appeal to the consciences of human beings to love one another?

    There is plenty of good money hoarded in the coffers of the rich to feed and clothe every human being on this planet in comfort. They should be the target of every human being with a conscience. The relative little that a Vatican Yard Sale would net would be gone in a month or two, and any example set forgotten in a year.

  • I’m not Catholic but every time I hear the argument that the Church should “sell all the golden candlesticks” the question pops up in my head, “Sell them to who?”

    All that art does not belong to the Pope, so who would do the selling? I always pictured the Vatican’s collection as the property of a sort of museum rather than that of one very rich man.

    And once these priceless works have been sold to the highest bidders, and the money redistributed (I am conveniently not asking how to go about doing that fairly) then what? The Church is stripped of a good chunk of its better history, some rich pig has the Pieta in his living room.

    I don’t see any good coming of it. Why not continue to live as simple a life as possible (which Francis does) and do his job, which is to appeal to the consciences of human beings to love one another?

    There is plenty of good money hoarded in the coffers of the rich to feed and clothe every human being on this planet in comfort. They should be the target of every human being with a conscience.The relative little that a Vatican Yard Sale would net would be gone in a month or two, and any example set forgotten in a year.

  • Okay, let me tell you, this new Pope has got me confused.

    The first thing I heard was that he was pretty seriously anti-gay, in his earlier incarnation as not-the-spokesman-for-God-Himself.

    And now support for humanity, support for the downtrodden, support for the reviled–dude, much as I hate to admit it, not being Catholic or a fan of their brand of faith or how they’ve historically gone about applying it, but you had me at support for humanity. Caring about others, helping those in need, believing all the stuff that makes the feral rich pee themselves in fear and loathing, I loved that part!

    And now ‘redistribute the ill-gotten gains of the few to the suffering many’? Wow. I’m stunned. I’m waiting, holding my breath, for the Catholic Church to start selling the gold, the sculptures, the incredible artwork, and using that money to replace the censers with brass ones, the candlesticks with pewter or brass, and oh, yes, helping the poor of the world.

    I’m sure it won’t be long, now. Please, my fingers are getting numb, and I think I’m turning blue. Please?

    Okay, enough snark. It’s a lovely sentiment, a delightful idea, and if he started the Catholic Church selling off the expensive stuff and used the proceeds from even one Bernini sculpture to buy mosquito nets for the kids in Africa, Asia and South America, I’d consider respecting the man.

    But in my considered opinion, if I’m right about how he really is, deep down inside, in spite of how he talks the talk, he’s never going to walk the walk. Just like most of the other ‘leaders’ of that faith, and most other faiths as well. If he says others ‘ought’ to do it, but won’t do it himself, commit his entire church to becoming an entity that does what it preaches, then he’s just another Southern ‘Baptist’ minister, praying for more money on teevee from the gullible–I mean ‘faithful’–in his four thousand dollar suit, ten thousand dollar wristwatch and two thousand dollar shoes, wiping the lying sweat from his brow with a silk hanky that costs more than many people in the world make in a month, or a year.

    No, I’m not really holding my breath waiting for it. And maybe someone like the pope talking the talk will inspire others to walk the walk, even while he’s sitting on a gold throne and wearing cloth-of-gold robes.

    But it’s more likely that I’ll go out for a walk one afternoon and meet Jesus.

    I weep for humanity.

    Henry D. Rinehart, cynic extraordinaire

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