Israeli Lawmaker: If UN Recognizes A Palestinian State, Israel Will Attack Within A Year

On Monday, Arab leaders backed a proposed UN Security Council resolution placing a 2017 deadline on the creation of a Palestinian State and the end of Israel’s decades long illegal occupation.  Israel responded by threatening immediate war with any such state.

Despite persistent claims from Israel and the US that the sole barrier to peace is the refusal of Palestinians to accept a two-state solution, yet in reality, both continually block any move towards such a solution.

US President Barack Obama has made repeated public appeals for the two-state solution, while vetoing Palestine’s bid to become a member of the United Nations. He publicly criticized Israel for expanding its illegal settlement construction, yet vetoed a planned UN Security Council Resolution to tackle the problem.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu once again publicly promised to oppose the creation of a Palestinian state as recently as July this year. Telling a press conference on July 11th:

“There cannot be a situation, under any agreement, in which we relinquish security control of the territory west of the River Jordan.”

If Israel doesn’t relinquish security control, Palestinians cannot establish a state. The alternative, then, would be a single state in which Palestinians are second class citizens, under occupation and without democratic rights.

“That sentence, quite simply, spells the end to the notion of Netanyahu consenting to the establishment of a Palestinian state,” summed up Times of Israel editor David Horovitz, whom Ha’aretz described as a Netanyahu supporter.

And so unsurprisingly, in response to this latest effort to uphold international law – this response from Israel lawmaker Yuli Edelstein:

“I don’t think it is a great idea to create a Palestinian state that we may have to attack a year from now because it will be an unlimited source of terrorism the way the Gaza Strip is.”

And here lies the problem with the two-state solution – it is a smokescreen, and undesirable even if it were possible.

So long as Israel remains wedded to the Zionist notion of a Jewish state, it will have to maintain its occupation of the Palestinians, in order to a) avoid the demographic realities that would undermine the racial character of the state, and b) avoid the democratic realities that would undermine the racial character of the state.  Israel, and its allies, will therefore continue to block any progress towards a solution that threatens that reality.

Secondly, there is a matter of principle here too. When we were calling for the end of Apartheid South Africa, we did not suggest separation, giving the white establishment control of the territory they’d ethnically cleansed and colonized while granting black South Africans sovereignty over the bantustans and townships. Why would we do so here?

Thirdly, Israel is buckling internally under the weight of this racist project. As a prominent Jewish-Israeli activist within the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement told me in Tel Aviv:

The Zionist project, particularly in Palestine, is a supremacist project. It’s not only a colonialist movement in that it demands the theft of resources, natural and human, of the indigenous people…But also says that this land is ours and only ours; and if you are not part of us you don’t belong here”

The consequences of which have been described by Gideon Levy, esteemed Israeli journalist and editor of Ha’aretz, Israel’s oldest daily newspaper:

“All the seeds of the incitement of the past few years, all the nationalistic, racist legislation and the incendiary propaganda, the scare campaigns and the subversion of democracy by the right-wing camp – all these have borne fruit, and that fruit is rank and rotten. The nationalist right has now sunk to a new level, with almost the whole country following in its wake. The word “fascism,” which I try to use as little as possible, finally has its deserved place in the Israeli political discourse.”

The only sustainable and principled solution for Israel-Palestine is a just peace: a single, secular state which grants equal rights and respect to all its citizens, regardless of their race or religion.

In the meantime, anything that puts pressure on governments in the West to promote the rights of self-determination, cultural identity and recognition of the plight of the Palestinians is no bad thing.

Feature Image Source – Jewish Voice Blog