A Conservative Website Literally Turned Dylann Roof Into The Murdering Racist He Is Today

Like Timothy McVeigh before him, Dylann Roof (the racist who shot up the Emanuel AME Church in Charleston), was heavily influenced by right-wing ideology. It’s well known that Timothy McVeigh was a huge anti-government, foaming-at-the-mouth-for-guns supporter and was friends with Republican NRA members who were influenced by the siege in Waco, Texas.

Roof, however, was influenced in a much more sinister way: right-wing racism.

In his own words, Roof wrote in his manifesto that he hadn’t grown up in a racist household, nor were his friends particularly racist. The white kids and black kids at his school would make racial jokes at each other, and jokes were jokes.

Then the killing of Trayvon Martin dominated the news cycle, and caught Roof’s attention:

“The event that truly awakened me was the Trayvon Martin case. I kept hearing and seeing his name, and eventually I decided to look him up. I read the Wikipedia article and right away I was unable to understand what the big deal was. It was obvious that Zimmerman was in the right. But more importantly this prompted me to type in the words “black on White crime” into Google, and I have never been the same since that day. The first website I came to was the Council of Conservative Citizens. There were pages upon pages of these brutal black on White murders. I was in disbelief. At this moment I realized that something was very wrong.”

Dr. Sam Francis founded the CCC in 1985, and called it “The country’s most effective conservative activist group.” He was also a syndicated writer for the Washington Times.

According to their website:

We’re winning the attention of politicians and the confidence of voters. After only a short time, the CofCC has had a major effect simply because we recognize that a victory achieved or election won at the local level is far more important than any number of prestigious contests or races lost

The Council of Conservative Citizens, supports, among other things:

  • That the United States is a Christian country.
  • That the people of the United States are part of the European people, no one else.
  • “Cultural, national and racial integrity” – A.K.A. xenophobia.
  • “States’ Rights, the Right to Keep and Bear Arms, and the Bill of Rights.”
  • That the traditional family is the only worthy family – no same sex marriage, interracial marriage, or any homosexual tendencies in society to be accepted under law.
  • Women and gays should not serve in the military.

Gee….does this all sound too familiar?

After “researching” deeper, Roof says he became racially aware:

“As an American we are taught to accept living in the melting pot, and black and other minorities have just as much right to be here as we do, since we are all immigrants. But Europe is the homeland of White people, and in many ways the situation is even worse there. From here I found out about the Jewish problem and other issues facing our race, and I can say today that I am completely racially aware.”

Bill Maher is right. Hillary Clinton is right. It’s this right-wing rhetoric that fuels and nourishes hatred, violence, and ignorance. And often those attributes fester into something truly sinister like we saw in Charleston.

It certainly doesn’t help when people like Ann Coulter are calling immigration the “browning of America,” and ties with it rape, murder and thievery. The GOP needs to take responsibility by denouncing these people as harmful, not just their own party, but to national discourse as a whole.

Feature image via New York Times