People Are Now Hilariously Trolling Marco Rubio By Showing Up To Rallies Dressed As Robots (IMAGE)

Marco Rubio sounded so robotic during the last GOP debate that people are now trolling him by dressing up as robots.

As you’ll recall, Rubio had a terrible performance on Saturday night thanks to the efforts of New Jersey Governor Chris Christie. Christie nailed Rubio for repeating the same line over and over again in a matter of minutes as if the Florida Senator malfunctioned and became a broken record.

“Let’s dispel once and for all with this fiction that Barack Obama doesn’t know what he’s doing,” Rubio said in response to Christie’s charge that Rubio lacks the experience to be president. “He knows exactly what he’s doing.”

Rubio would go on to repeat the line several more times.

“Let’s dispel with this fiction that Barack Obama doesn’t know what he’s doing. He knows exactly what he’s doing.”

“Here’s the bottom line. This notion that Barack Obama doesn’t know what he’s doing is just not true. He knows exactly what he’s doing.”

Christie didn’t let Rubio get away with it either. Christie accused Rubio of being scripted.

“This is what Washington D.C. does,” Christie said. “The drive-by shot at the beginning with incorrect and incomplete information and then the memorized 25-second speech. That is exactly what his advisers gave him.”

It was a disaster for Rubio, especially since he looked to be rising in the New Hampshire polls. But now, he’s seen as a robot who is pre-programmed to say certain things.

And he’s not going to able to forget about his robotic blunder any time soon.

Some clever people had the brilliant idea to troll Rubio by dressing up as robots. In the Twitter image below, you can see two guys in their robot gear. One is named Marco Roboto and the other is called Rubio Talking Point 3000.

As if the Republican primary couldn’t get any stranger, we now have robots trolling the candidates and we have Marco Rubio to thank for it.

Domo arigato, Marco Roboto.


 

Featured image from Digital Journal