Here’s How The NFL Will Punish This State If It Passes Anti-Gay Law

Georgia risks losing a chance to host the Super Bowl if an anti-gay bill currently working its way through the state legislature becomes law. The National Football League has issued a statement on Georgia’s so-called “religious freedom” legislation, House Bill 757.

“NFL policies emphasize tolerance and inclusiveness, and prohibit discrimination based on age, gender, race, religion, sexual orientation, or any other improper standard,” NFL spokesman Brian McCarthy said in a statement. “Whether the laws and regulations of a state and local community are consistent with these policies would be one of many factors NFL owners may use to evaluate potential Super Bowl host sites.”

The Falcons are currently building a new stadium in Atlanta, which is slated to open in 2017. They were hoping to host a Super Bowl there in either 2019 or 2020. The league has often given new stadiums, particularly in warmer climates, an opportunity to host the championship game.

The law in question would allow faith-based groups to refuse service to people if that service violated the group’s religious beliefs. That has re-ignited fears of discrimination against LGBT Americans enshrined in the law.

“This would allow organizations to discriminate against LGBT people or single mothers who have no ministerial function within the religious organization, like a janitor, a cafeteria worker, an administrative assistant,” said Anthony Kreis, a professor at the University of Georgia and an expert in constitutional law.

Arthur Blank, co-founder of Home Depot and owner of the Falcons, opposes the bill. He said it “would have long-lasting negative impact on our state and the people of Georgia.”

Like what happened in Indiana, hundreds of business leaders oppose Georgia’s “religious freedom” law, which now awaits the signature of Governor Nathan Deal, a Republican, to become the law. Deal had previously said he would not sign a bill that allows discrimination.


 

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